Electrician Salary in The USA

Published: Oct 24, 2022
Electrician Salary in The USA

 

Skilled tradespeople are always in demand and few more so than electricians. Required for a huge range of jobs in domestic, commercial and industrial settings, electrical contractors help to keep our lights on and our appliances fully charged.

Because skilled electricians are always needed, the profession is a fantastic choice for anyone looking for an interesting, varied and lucrative career. Over the past few years, electricians have seen their average salary increase, with many now making more than $80,000 a year, even with little to no experience.

If you’re considering a career change and want to know exactly how much you can expect to earn, take a look at our guide to the average electrician salary.

Average Electrician Salary

The amount you can earn as an electrician will vary depending on your qualifications and experience. Apprentices and entry-level electricians generally receive the lowest pay, and those with more years of experience, like a master electrician, receive the highest salary. You may also be able to increase your earnings by specializing in certain areas like solar energy, industrial electrical systems or high-tech installations.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in 2021, the median salary for an electrician in the US was $60,040 per year. That works out to an hourly wage of around $28.87. The lowest 10% of electricians working in the country earned $37,020 per year, while those in the 90th percentile and above took home an annual salary of over $99,800.

Most electricians in the US work full-time and many are self-employed. A large number of electricians work in the construction industry, though many are also employed in maintenance, in industrial settings and on government contracts.

According to the BLS, the average electrician salary for a government worker is $63,640. Those working in manufacturing earn around $62,210 per year, while electrical contractors and other electrical wiring installation contractors take home an average of $58,760

Electrician Salary by State

Recent figures show that electricians in Oregon and Massachusetts have the highest annual income with an average salary of $78,000. The lowest annual salary can be found in Florida, where electricians take home an average of $46,339.

In all states, an electrician’s position on the payscale will depend on their experience and qualifications. Top-paying job openings can exceed $100,000, although most electrician jobs will pay closer to the national average.

So how much do electricians make in each state? Take a look at the table below to find out an electrician’s average salary in each state.

Alabama $46,800
Alaska $67,899
Arizona $51,456
Arkansas $51,675
California $64,683
Colorado $61,425
Connecticut $73,125
Delaware $59,515
Florida $46,339
Georgia $48,755
Hawaii $64,416
Idaho $57,525
Illinois $58,500
Indiana $53,625
Iowa $58,350
Kansas $53,625
Kentucky $53,626
Louisiana $46,800
Maine $59,100
Maryland $53,625
Massachusetts $78,000
Michigan $55,582
Minnesota $72,514
Mississippi $49,725
Missouri $55,146
Montana $64,350
Nebraska $59,905
Nevada $58,500
New Hampshire $66,099
New Jersey $58,500
New Mexico $56,383
New York $55,495
North Carolina $48,750
North Dakota $68,250
Ohio $55,575
Oklahoma $54,600
Oregon $78,000
Pennsylvania $53,625
Rhode Island $74,550
South Carolina $46,806
South Dakota $55,000
Tennessee $48,750
Texas $50,700
Utah $59,514
Vermont $58,500
Virginia $52,930
Washington $77,012
West Virginia $51,675
Wisconsin $58,500
Wyoming $68,250

Cities with the Best Electrician Salaries

The city with the highest average electrician salary is Chicago. According to figures published in 2022, the average wage for electricians in the city is $95,040. An electrician apprentice in Chicago can earn around $48,880 and an experienced journeyman electrician could expect to earn somewhere in the middle of the salary range.

Kennewick in Washington comes in second place with an average electrician salary of $94,570, and San Francisco comes in third place with electricians seeing average earnings of $92,730. All apart from one of the cities in the top 10 for electrician income are in Illinois, California and Washington. The Southeast Alaska nonmetropolitan area comes in 10th place with average earnings of $80,380. Choosing a city with a low cost of living will help electricians’ wages go even further.

Should I Become an Electrician?

Electricians can earn an excellent income in all corners of the country. Their skills are always in demand and the work they tackle is varied and challenging. This makes electrical work an attractive prospect for many looking for a new career. According to the BLS, electricians make over $12,000 a year more than other construction trade workers. Making it a great choice for people who want to maximize their earnings.

If you’ve been impressed by how much electricians make, you may well be wondering how to become an electrician yourself. The career path to becoming an electrician is relatively straightforward and, in most cases, all you’ll need to get started is a high school diploma.

Before you can qualify as a residential or industrial electrician, you’ll need to successfully complete an apprenticeship. You can then register with the licensing body in your state and make a start on your new career. Apprenticeships are available in cities across the US. You can contact your local electricians’ union or trade school to find out more about opportunities near you.

In most states, industrial, commercial and residential electricians are required to get bonded before they can get a license. An electrical contractor bond is designed to ensure all electricians abide by the rules set out by their governing body. It also protects the public from financial loss caused by fraudulent business practices.

The following two tabs change content below.

Robin Kix

Robin Kix is currently the Renewal Department Manager. Since joining Lance Surety in 2014, she has helped thousands of businesses throughout the nation remain compliant at the federal, state and local level. She has significant experience supporting commercial bond lines, particularly in the automobile, transportation and construction industries. Robin and her team work together to create a positive customer service experience at the time of every policy renewal, whether that be finding the best pricing or offering additional assistance.